24-26 JULY 2015

WINCHESTER DISCOVERY CENTRE

ABOUT

Winchester Science Festival is the working project of the not-for-profit organisation Winchester
Science Foundation. We aim to…

Champion and celebrate science with the public
Promote science education and science communication
Raise the awareness of Hampshire science

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  • Science
  • Hands on Exhibits
  • Plenty of Entertainment

SPEAKERS

PROGRAM SUBJECT TO CHANGE

BEN LITTLEFIELD

BIO

TBC

DR.JENNY JOSEPHS

BIO

Dr Jenny Josephs is a research psychologist and founder of UK start-up, The Bug Shack.

Inspired by the low maintenance of her own pet bugs, after completing her PhD at Southampton University she began investigating the environmental and nutritional benefits of edible insects. The Bug Shack was launched last year with the aim of promoting edible insects at science and sustainability events and engaging with people who will join the insect food revolution.

Dr Jenny Josephs will be coming to Winchester Science Festival to explain the relevance of eating insects in the modern age, as populations and mega-cities continue to grow, and as environmental and economic sustainability become paramount.

JAMES DYKE

BIO
Dr James Dyke model’s the Earth systems in order to try to understand how it works and how humans interact with it.

He joined the University of Southampton in 2011 based in the Agents, Interaction and Complexity group within Electronics & Computer Science. His main role was as a tutor and then Acting Director of the Institute for Complex Systems Simulation Doctoral Training Centre. He transferred to Geography & Environment in August 2014.

His previous job at the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry was centrered around the Helmholtz Alliance project Planetary Evolution and Life that was coordinated by the German Aerospace Agency. He is a member of the NASA Astrobiology Focus Group Thermodynamics, Disequilibrium and Evolution.

MOIRA MACLEAN AND KATHRINE

BIO

TBC

JON BUTTERWORTH

BIO

Jon Butterworth is a physics professor at University College London. He is a member of the UCL High Energy Physics group and works on the Atlas experiment at Cern’sLarge Hadron Collider. His book Smashing Physics: The Inside Story of the Hunt for the Higgs was published in May 2014 and Jon will be signing copies of his book after his talk.

DR DAVID MARTILL

BIO

I am a reader in Palaeobiology specialising in the life and its ecology of the Cretaceous period. My special interest are in dinosaurs, pterosaurs with some emphasis on the fossils of Gondwana. I am also very interested in how fossils are formed. I have worked in Malawi, Brazil, Papua New Guinea and North Africa. I lead field expeditions to Morocco every year, often taking students along. Presently I am studying new dinosaurs from England and Brazil.

I graduated from Leicester University with a BSc where I stayed to study for my PhD. I was a Harkness Fellow at the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, and worked for the Open University. I have been at the University of Portsmouth for the last 20 years.

PROFESSOR WILL PERCIVAL

BIO

TBC

DALLAS CAMPBELL AND FRIENDS

BIO

TBC

DR JOANNE PRESTON

BIO

Dr Joanne Preston is a lecturer in Marine Biology at the University of Portsmouth. Her research seeks to investigate the interactions between marine organisms and their environment, particularly in response to the pressures of climate change. Joanne uses a range of techniques in her research, from DNA sequences to light synchrotrons. These powerful techniques were applied to illuminate our understanding of the microbiology of the Mary Rose Tudor warship. Collaborative research with the Mary Rose trust revealed how microbes found in the Mary Rose hull and other artefacts are interacting with Iron and Sulfur to produce sulphuric acid under extreme conditions.

SUZI GAGE

BIO

TBC

DR JEROME MICHELETTA

BIO

Dr Jérôme Micheletta is a Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Portsmouth and member of the Centre for Comparative and Evolutionary Psychology. His main interests are the evolution of complex communication and how it relates to characteristics of nonhuman primates’ social systems. He mostly studies the communication system of the socially tolerant and understudied crested macaque (Macaca nigra), combining observations of wild animals and cognitive experiments with captive populations in the Macaque Study Centre at Marwell Zoo.

DALE LANE

BIO

Dale Lane is one of the developers of IBM Watson, a question answering computer system that became famous when it was entered as a contestant on the US television quiz show Jeopardy! in 2011. Since winning on the TV quiz show, Dale and the rest of the Watson Group have been expanding Watson’s capabilities, and training Watson to be able to help in a number of other domains, from healthcare to retail.

TAMSIN EDWARDS

BIO

TBC

MARCUS CHOWN

BIO

Marcus Chown is an award-winning writer and broadcaster. Formerly a radio astronomer at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, he is cosmology consultant of New Scientist. His books include What A Wonderful World, Quantum Theory Cannot Hurt You, Felicity Frobisher and the Three-Headed Aldebaran Dust Devil, and We Need to Talk to Kelvin, which was short-listed for the 2010 Royal Society Book Prize. Marcus has also tried his hand at Apps and won The Bookseller Digital Innovation of the Year for Solar System for iPad. Marcus was a regular guest on the BBC4 comedy-science show, It’s Only A Theory, with Andy Hamilton and Reginald D. Hunter, and often appears on Channel 4’s Sunday Brunch. He has appeared at a variety of events from the Cheltenham Literary Festival to the Sydney Writers Festival, from the National Theatre to the Wilderness Festival. And he has done stand-at comedy at a variety of venues from an upturned inflatable cow on London’s South Bank to a glass-bottomed boat in a shark tank at the Brighton Sealife Centre.

NORMAN FENTON

BIO

Norman Fenton is Professor of Risk Information Management at Queen Mary London University and is also Chief Executive Officer of Agena, a company that specialises in risk management for critical systems.

Norman, who is a mathematician by training, works on quantitative risk assessment. This typically involves analysing and predicting the probabilities of unknown events using Bayesian statistical methods including especially causal, probabilistic models (Bayesian networks). This type of reasoning enables improved assessment by taking account of both statistical data and also expert judgment.

In April 2014 Norman was awarded one of the prestigious European Research Council Advanced Grants to focus on these issues. Norman’s experience in risk assessment covers a wide range of application domains such as legal reasoning (he has been an expert witness in major criminal and civil cases), medical analytics, vehicle reliability, embedded software, transport systems, financial services, and football prediction.

Norman has a special interest in raising public awareness of the importance of probability theory and Bayesian reasoning in everyday life (including how to present such reasoning in simple lay terms) and he maintains a website dedicated to this and also a blog focusing on probability and the law. In March 2015 Norman presented the BBC documentary Climate Change by Numbers.

ANDREW MORSE

BIO

Dr. Andrew Morse is a Research Scientist in the Department of Physical Sciences at the Open University. His research interest is in developing mass spectrometers for space missions to determine the conditions and processes occurring during the formation of the solar system. He is part of the team which built Ptolemy, an instrument on-board Philae which, despite the challenging landing, managed to return information about the chemical composition of the comet.

SIMON WATT

BIO

TBC

FRIDAY

FLAMES, BRAINS AND NUCLEAR REACTORSBEN LITTLE FIELD 10.00-11.00
TBC
THERE WAS A YOUNG LADY WHO SWALLOWED A FLY...DR JENNY JOSEPHS 11.15-12.15
Human insect eating is common to 80% of the worlds nations and is common on every continent apart from ours (Europe). Dr Jenny Josephs will explain why overcoming our squemishness about bugs may be the most important advance in food security in a generation. You will all have a chance to hold some creepy crawlies after the talk and you can even try some delicious bug snacks in the lunch break!
ASTRONAUTS NEEDED FOR SPACESHIP EARTHJAMES DYKE 12.30-13.30
There are no passengers on Spaceship Earth. We are all crew.

We fly through space at thousands of miles an hour on the surface of a planetary spaceship. We may not be able to steer this spaceship (which is just as well because we don’t want to crash into the Sun!) but we are able to change some important properties that we, and all life on Earth depend on. Find out how by coming to this talk that will feature rocket videos, experiments, and the opportunity to try on SCUBA diving kit.

LUNCH 13.30-14.30

A BIOLOGICAL JOURNEY THROUGH THE SOLENTMOIRA MACLEAN AND KATHERINE 14.30-15.30
TBC
SMASHING PHYSICSJON BUTTERWORTH 15.45-16.45
The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and François Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.

But what really is a Higgs boson and what does it do? How was it found? And how has its discovery changed our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature? And what did it feel like to be part of it?

TBCTBC 17.00-18.00
The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and François Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.

But what really is a Higgs boson and what does it do? How was it found? And how has its discovery changed our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature? And what did it feel like to be part of it?

SATURDAY

DINOSAUR HUNTING IN THE SAHARA DESERTDR DAVID MARTILL 10.00-11.00
TBC
MAPPING THE UNIVERSEPROFESSOR WILL PERCIVAL 11.15-12.15
Professor Will Percival, will review the latest theories of the history of the Universe from the Big Bang to present day. The evidence for this model will then be considered, focussing on how large surveys of galaxies provide a wealth of information about the Universe in which we live. The Universe has an interesting history, going through periods of rapid acceleration and deceleration, rather like a car in rush-hour traffic. By mapping the Universe as a function of look-back time (the time taken for the light from distant galaxies to reach us), we can observe these different phases, and understand the processes causing them.
DEBATE: HOW CAN THEY LOOK INTO MY EYES AND STILL THEY DON'T BELIEVE ME?DALLAS CAMPBELL AND FRIENDS 12.30-13.30
TBC

LUNCH 13.30-14.30

WHAT'S EATING THE MARY ROSEDR JOANNE PRESTON 14.30-15.30
The Mary Rose Tudor warship provides a unique environment for scientific research. Almost 500 years of submersion and burial in marine sediment allowed large quantities of sulphur and iron compounds to build up, which led to the production of wood-degrading sulphuric acid when the ship was raised and exposed to water and oxygen. In this talk we will discover the extreme microbial communities that reside in the Mary Rose and how environmental microbiology research and archaeological conservation combine to protect King Henry VIII’s iconic warship.
TBCSUZI GAGE 15.45-16.45
TBC
WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM MACAQUES?DR JEROME MICHELETTA 17.00-18.00
Like humans and other primates, macaques have big brains and live in large social groups. In order to live in these complex groups, they need to keep track of each other and take part in intricate social interactions. To do this, they use sophisticated and subtle communication, such as facial expressions, body postures and vocalisations. Humans are closely related to macaques as we have all evolved from a common ancestor. In this talk, Dr Jerome Micheletta will explain how better understanding the macaques’ behaviour helps us to understand how and why humans behave the way we do.

SUNDAY

UNDERSTANDING COMPUTERSDALE LANE 10.00-11.00
Why are we still not able to communicate with computers as though they were humans, like Captain Kirk could in Star Trek? Through humorous examples, Dale Lane will explain the pitfalls that hinder computers from understanding us, and introduces us to IBM’s Watson, a computer so in tune with humans’ natural language that it can even beat us at our own game (Jeopardy).
TBCTAMSIN EDWARDS 11.15-12.15
TBC
WHAT A WONDERFUL WORLD; ONE MAN'S ATTEMPT TO EXPLAIN THE BIG STUFFMARCUS CHOWN 12.30-13.30
Did you know that babies are powered by rocket fuel? You could fit the human race in the volume of a sugar cube? Time travel is not ruled out by the laws of physics? 98% of the universe is invisible? And the most amazing picture in the history of science is a single pixel across? Find out more from Marcus Chown, author of What A Wonderful World.

LUNCH 13.30-14.30

FALLACIES OF PROBABILITY AND RISKNORMAN FENTON 14.30-15.30
From Climate Change and Surgical Decisions to Motor Insurance or Forensic Evidence, Bayesian reasoning and analysis offers us a remarkable insight into why the world behaves the way it does and how we can prepare ourselves for future events.
THE ROSETTA MISSION TO CATCH A COMETANDREW MORSE 15.45-16.45
Following a 10 year journey to a comet, the Rosetta space mission succeeded in landing Philae onto the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko in November 2014. Despite the landing not quite going to plan, Philae sent back a wealth of data that is changing our understanding of comets and the formation of our solar system. In this talk, Dr Andrew Morse will give an overview of the mission and highlight some of the science results so far.
THE REAL URBAN JUNGLESIMON WATT 17.00-18.00
Nature is under attack. The rainforests are shrinking, the ice caps melting, the seas poisoned. But there is one habitat that is expanding and thriving: the urban jungle. Our cities are not just filled with human life but with a surprising array of species that have come to live alongside us. In the heart of the city, evolution is moving at breakneck speed. Countless species are adapting to living in towns and, in some cases, entirely new species are being born. Join Simon Watt as he look s at some of our new neighbours

SPONSORS

Winchester Science Festival is grateful for the kind and generous support of the the following partners.

We look forward to seeing you!